GROW WELL | WHAIORA - Spatial Plan for the Queenstown Lakes

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We'd like to thank all those who took the time to join one of our Spatial Plan district-wide community workshops or engaged with us online via Let’s Talk towards the end of last year.

We, along with our Central Government and Kāi Tahu partners have welcomed hearing community insights on how to ‘grow well’ for the next 30 years and for generations to come.

The feedback and key themes to come out of the Spatial Plan pre-engagement campaign have now been collated and summarised and we’d like to share these with you.

>>Read the Spatial Plan Early Insights Engagement Summary here

While we did hear a lot of differing views as we travelled throughout the district, overall the people who call the Queenstown Lakes their home have common aspirations for how they would like the district to look in the future.

These findings will help develop a draft Spatial Plan for our district including where and how we live in the future and what this means for our infrastructure and community facilities.

Next steps

Recent COVID-19 developments mean that we've had to revisit the modelling that was undertaken before the global pandemic along with some of the assumptions around aspects such as our economic growth and diversity, and population projections.

We are working closely with our Central Government and Kāi Tahu partners to review timelines and allow for understanding what a recovery phase looks like in our project and the effects it has. The project is still progressing and we will be engaging with the community formally when the draft plan is released. As part of this ongoing work we plan to have targeted conversations in settlements that could be considered growth areas in the future.

We’ll be back in touch to share this draft Spatial Plan document with you and let you know how to take part in the next stage of the process.

Grow Well | Whaiora

The Spatial Plan is being based around the phrase ‘Grow Well’ or ‘Whaiora’ in Te Reo Māori which translates to “in the pursuit of wellness”.

It is our goal, as part of the Lakes District community, to support positive change that benefits the wellbeing of the whole district both now and in the future.

>> Read the Grow Well I Whaiora Spatial Plan information booklet here

We'd like to thank all those who took the time to join one of our Spatial Plan district-wide community workshops or engaged with us online via Let’s Talk towards the end of last year.

We, along with our Central Government and Kāi Tahu partners have welcomed hearing community insights on how to ‘grow well’ for the next 30 years and for generations to come.

The feedback and key themes to come out of the Spatial Plan pre-engagement campaign have now been collated and summarised and we’d like to share these with you.

>>Read the Spatial Plan Early Insights Engagement Summary here

While we did hear a lot of differing views as we travelled throughout the district, overall the people who call the Queenstown Lakes their home have common aspirations for how they would like the district to look in the future.

These findings will help develop a draft Spatial Plan for our district including where and how we live in the future and what this means for our infrastructure and community facilities.

Next steps

Recent COVID-19 developments mean that we've had to revisit the modelling that was undertaken before the global pandemic along with some of the assumptions around aspects such as our economic growth and diversity, and population projections.

We are working closely with our Central Government and Kāi Tahu partners to review timelines and allow for understanding what a recovery phase looks like in our project and the effects it has. The project is still progressing and we will be engaging with the community formally when the draft plan is released. As part of this ongoing work we plan to have targeted conversations in settlements that could be considered growth areas in the future.

We’ll be back in touch to share this draft Spatial Plan document with you and let you know how to take part in the next stage of the process.

Grow Well | Whaiora

The Spatial Plan is being based around the phrase ‘Grow Well’ or ‘Whaiora’ in Te Reo Māori which translates to “in the pursuit of wellness”.

It is our goal, as part of the Lakes District community, to support positive change that benefits the wellbeing of the whole district both now and in the future.

>> Read the Grow Well I Whaiora Spatial Plan information booklet here

Do you have a question about the Spatial Plan?  Ask it here and we'll get it answered as soon as possible. 

All questions and answers will be published here for everyone to see. 


Q&A

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    I commented at the Frankton workshop how brave it was that the maps showed Frankton without the airport. When discussing this with you later I learned that you had not meant this to be explicit. I find this troubling. The absence of the airport stradling Frankton massively impacted on the choices made by the group at our table. All the participants around our table at the workshop resoundingly supported the centralised scenario, because, in the absence of the airport, they envisaged a wonderful mountain town developing at Frankton. Several were familiar with the Frankton Masterplan developed by David Jerram and Gillian Macleod. Had the airport been on the map, the outcome would have been completely different. Informed by the QLDC 30-yr Masterplan for Frankton, none would have encouraged increased density in Frankton with the airport in situ. Pretty much all of the ranking criteria would skew away from intensifying Frankton despite the otherwise obvious benefits. I think that it's really important that you explicitly compare and contrast whether or not the airport is present within Frankton during this early scoping period. It is without question the single largest building block for this study. As such it must be amongst the first explored. The map exercise shows how much this single decision would impact on the future social and economic impacts.  It is wrong, therefore, to think it can be left until after these assessments are completed. Quite the opposite, this should inform those assessments. I'd love to hear how you will progress this.

    waikiwi Asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for joining us and sharing your views at the Frankton community workshop. As discussed during the evening, the maps used in the workshop session were high level concept drawings. They purposefully did not show the location of local roads, social infrastructure and transport hubs (such as airports). The primary use of these maps were to help facilitate discussion with the community by helping to show likely outcomes of different growth scenarios in the Wakatipu.

    We would like to acknowledge that the airport is a very important consideration. We clarified at the start of the workshop that these sessions would not go into the detail of the different airport scenarios, as although they are an important factor, there are also a number of other factors in developing a draft plan and defining the timelines over which this first iteration of the plan spans. We are currently in the process of getting an Economic and Social Impacts Assessment relating to possible futures for both the Queenstown and Wanaka airports through MartinJenkins consultants. The work will deliver new fact based information and undertake relevant community engagement which will then be used as one or a number of sources to inform the draft Spatial Plan and other Council future decision making.

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    I attended the most interesting workshop in Wanaka last evening and a number of issues came up at our and neighbouring tables, I would appreciate some clarification and comment on the following: 1- The convenor stated in her opening remarks that the Spatial Plan was "not a tool to limit growth" - this confuses me, it strikes me that the Spatial Plan is all about "forecast" growth and its management - if our community seeks to limit or moderate the growth all QLDC staffers seem so excited about then surely the Spatial Plan - along with all the other "parallel planning documents" under preparation should be a pivotally important document in the execution of our communities needs and desires - whatever they may be. How does a community, lets say the Upper Clutha basin, have its collective desires embodied in planning policy and then enforced? 2- Following on from these comments, the convenor also said that "Councils do not have a lot of tools at their disposal to limit growth" This is an equally surprising comment - why engage in an endeavour like this if one of the options - the limitation of growth - has been removed from the outcomes. It would seem to me to be a fundamental responsibility of local government to facilitate the planning process that the community desires - if that were to "limit growth" then please explain why the council is impotent in the execution of the communities collective desire? I always thought the council worked for us, the collective community. 3- A pivotally important issue arose last evening. I recall the council staff highlighted that to house the "forecasted growth" to 2050 in the Upper Clutha something in the order of 7,000 new dwellings would be required. On questioning, it was explained that was new dwellings in addition to the existing built housing stock. A current council member then explained that on best estimates (no idea of the source) there were already up to 5000 currently approved residential building platforms in the Upper Clutha which had no building on them. (i) Does the council have hard data on this?, (ii) If that is the case, then surely the aggregate approval appetite for new dwelling permissions in the Upper Clutha should be capped at 2000 dwellings to be approved in the next 30 years - please comment. 4- There was a lot of conversation about the need for high density, small footprint, multi-family dwellings in the region. In light of 3 above, what is the breakdown of the permitted but currently unconstructed dwellings in terms of housing types? We can chat all we like about the need for high-density living BUT if the council has already approved, for example, 5000 single-family dwellings, how does it intend dealing with this mismatch of desired build mix verses already consented building platforms? Does this mean that ALL the remaining 2000 homes needed by 2050 - see 3 above - will need to be high-density, multifamily dwellings to achieve the council's goals of mixed housing types? Thank you.

    AGKD Asked 11 months ago

    Thanks for your comments and for taking the time to head along to the community workshop.

    We (the Council or ‘collective community’) can not ‘close the gates’ to people wanting to make this special place their home.  Whether you’re a long term local or have been here for a few months, the vast majority of people who live across the district have chosen to come here from other places.  What the Council can do is put in place a strategy to ‘grow well’ to protect and enhance our community wellbeing. 

    As you may recall hearing during the workshop, the Spatial Plan will also serve as our Future Development Strategy.  This work is a requirement under the Government’s National Policy Statement for Urban Development Capacity and we are committed to making sure it is done in a way that supports positive change and benefits the wellbeing of our district bot now and in the future. 

    In terms of your question on dwellings, Wanaka has capacity for approximately 5,000 additional dwellings (based on Greenfeilds alone). When redevelopment and infill are accounted for this number increases to a total of 8,570 (note these figures are based on the notified Stage 1 PDP).


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    Hello Anita, while attending the Frankton workshop for the Spatial Plan, I was told that the maps used to show the three different population distribution scenarios along with the question against which they were ranked would be available online at Let's Talk. I'm sorry, but I haven't been able to find these. Could you please help by sending me the link? Thank you.

    waikiwi Asked 10 months ago

    Hello, the maps are now available on the Let's Talk site under the document library section. They are also available to view and comment on through our online survey. The feedback close date has recently been extended to the 8 December. Thank you.

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    One could be forgiven for feeling that the Council is merely going through a process of consultation and has no real intention of taking any notice of the input received. For example, despite the fact the majority of submitters to the consultation on altering speed limits were against any change, the Council implemented them anyway. Will this consultation be any different?

    allard Asked 11 months ago

    Thanks for your question. Every public consultation, whether it’s a formal process under legislation or an informal  engagement, is run with a genuine interest in hearing community views. It’s important to note that a public consultation is not a vote. All feedback is considered and fed into proposals where possible and appropriate. This feedback is also always provided to elected members verbatim and considered as part of their decision making process. Often there is a lot of evidence, expert analysis etc that must be considered too and at times difficult decisions need to be made, for example lowering some speed limits to improve the safety for all road users. We hope you do take part in this important planning process. If you can’t make it along to a workshop, the online survey will only take a few minutes of your time and will feed into how we plan for growth as a district over the next thirty plus years. 

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    Why are we including Cromwell in the Spatial Plan?

    11 months ago

    The Spatial Plan will include Cromwell as an integral part of the wider Lakes District community, recognising the growing interrelationship with Wanaka and Queenstown and the increasing number of people regularly commuting in and out of the district via the Kawarau Gorge. It’s also a key gateway into the area for visitors.  By considering Cromwell’s masterplanning projects it will help enable a comprehensive overview of the region and how it works with neighbouring districts.


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    Will the Spatial Plan discuss long-term provisions to protect rural landscapes in the District (both Rural Character Landscapes and Outstanding Natural Landscapes/Features) from the cumulative adverse effects of development given that the local and national economy rely on these rural landscapes being protected from (and not degraded by) development?

    Julian Haworth Asked 11 months ago

    A well-designed Spatial Plan will ensure that future growth does not compromise the unique landscapes, sites of significance to iwi and environment that are important to our communities and visitors. It takes an intentional view of the future to ensure development is strategic and integrated to the benefit of our communities.

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    Is there a reason you aren't including Arrowtown in the consultation? You have included the other regional areas but not this one, and the needs/views will not be the same as Frankton which would be the closest session,

    DaveHS Asked 11 months ago

    Arrowtown and all townships are included in this engagement activity as the Spatial Plan looks at the how townships and settlements work together and allow us to consider the district as a whole. The locations that the workshops are being held in are not indicative of inclusion or otherwise but aim to give us a variety of perspectives in smaller townships as well as around some of the larger hubs forming part of a bigger picture conversation of the Wakatipu and Upper Clutha areas. This means if you live in Arrowtown, Arthurs Point or Lake Hayes Estate etc. you would be welcome to attend the workshops in Frankton, Queenstown, Kingston etc. and your insights and feedback would be relevant and valued. The workshops will be made up of group activities designed to test scenarios and help communities build consensus on the future of their towns and settlements. We are also keen for people from across the district to get involved via this site too.