Wakatipu Active Travel Business Case

Status: Preferred network being considered

What is the project?

The opportunity to further develop a walking and cycling network has been identified in several recent studies of the area. An integrated network for walking and cycling that connects to public transport would help provide a genuine alternative to our reliance on private vehicles. It would also help combat growing congestion.

Across the Wakatipu Basin there are 190km of existing trails for walking, hiking and cycling. These routes are very popular, but they are mostly used by recreational users and tourists. The routes are incomplete and do not currently form a comprehensive network that connect peoples’ homes, workplaces, education and other destinations. Some of the routes are too steep, while others are too narrow, inadequately lit or are too close to fast flowing traffic, causing safety concerns.

To give locals and visitors genuine choice in how they move about the Wakatipu Basin and encourage people to cycle or walk, the existing network of trails, tracks and routes must be improved and expanded.

The project includes upgrades to the existing trails as well as several new trails, connecting key destinations including Arrowtown, Arthurs Point, Kelvin Heights, Jacks Point, Lake Hayes Estate and Shotover Country, Fernhill, Frankton and Queenstown.

By investigating these 10 routes together, we hope to develop a comprehensive network across the Wakatipu Basin. We want the network to cater for all ages and abilities, providing safe routes for school children, the elderly, commuters, recreational users, and the mobility impaired.

  • The goal is to create a network for walking and cycling that:
  • Provides enjoyable journeys
  • Improves safety
  • Connects with other modes of transport
  • Benefits the community and local economy
  • And encourages more people to walk or cycle rather than travel by car


Progress so far

Last year we held a workshop to define the problem and identify the benefits that we want to achieve if we were to get funding for an active travel network.

Together with the Queenstown Trails Trust, we created a list of options for each of the routes. We have met with a number of stakeholders including local schools, Iwi and the Department of Conservation to seek their input.

Using their feedback and our research, we analysed each of the options against a range of social, environmental and economic criteria to come up with the draft preferred network shown below.


Proposed network - interactive map

Click on the map below to open the interactive map. Then navigate around the proposed network by clicking on the route numbers.


We need your help:

Please tell us:

  • If and how you use the existing trails and what issues you have around walking or cycling around wakatipu.
  • Are there particular facilities you would like to see along the routes? Where should these be located?
  • Which routes should be sealed with asphalt and which should be gravel?
  • Should the route from Kelvin Heights to Frankton be an upgrade of the existing waterfront trail so that it is sealed, widened and lit, or a new route along Peninsula Road?

Take the survey now and give us your views!


Next steps

The information you provide will be used alongside our technical research to test the preferred network.

We need to determine the level of design for each route (i.e. gravel or asphalt, route width and facilities) and identify how much land will be needed. Once we have confirmed the preferred network we can finalise the Business Case, ready to be submitted for funding.

If funding is approved, we will undertake detailed design (looking at each route in closer detail) and get any necessary approvals under the Resource Management Act. There will be further opportunities for public engagement during this time.


Status: Preferred network being considered

What is the project?

The opportunity to further develop a walking and cycling network has been identified in several recent studies of the area. An integrated network for walking and cycling that connects to public transport would help provide a genuine alternative to our reliance on private vehicles. It would also help combat growing congestion.

Across the Wakatipu Basin there are 190km of existing trails for walking, hiking and cycling. These routes are very popular, but they are mostly used by recreational users and tourists. The routes are incomplete and do not currently form a comprehensive network that connect peoples’ homes, workplaces, education and other destinations. Some of the routes are too steep, while others are too narrow, inadequately lit or are too close to fast flowing traffic, causing safety concerns.

To give locals and visitors genuine choice in how they move about the Wakatipu Basin and encourage people to cycle or walk, the existing network of trails, tracks and routes must be improved and expanded.

The project includes upgrades to the existing trails as well as several new trails, connecting key destinations including Arrowtown, Arthurs Point, Kelvin Heights, Jacks Point, Lake Hayes Estate and Shotover Country, Fernhill, Frankton and Queenstown.

By investigating these 10 routes together, we hope to develop a comprehensive network across the Wakatipu Basin. We want the network to cater for all ages and abilities, providing safe routes for school children, the elderly, commuters, recreational users, and the mobility impaired.

  • The goal is to create a network for walking and cycling that:
  • Provides enjoyable journeys
  • Improves safety
  • Connects with other modes of transport
  • Benefits the community and local economy
  • And encourages more people to walk or cycle rather than travel by car


Progress so far

Last year we held a workshop to define the problem and identify the benefits that we want to achieve if we were to get funding for an active travel network.

Together with the Queenstown Trails Trust, we created a list of options for each of the routes. We have met with a number of stakeholders including local schools, Iwi and the Department of Conservation to seek their input.

Using their feedback and our research, we analysed each of the options against a range of social, environmental and economic criteria to come up with the draft preferred network shown below.


Proposed network - interactive map

Click on the map below to open the interactive map. Then navigate around the proposed network by clicking on the route numbers.


We need your help:

Please tell us:

  • If and how you use the existing trails and what issues you have around walking or cycling around wakatipu.
  • Are there particular facilities you would like to see along the routes? Where should these be located?
  • Which routes should be sealed with asphalt and which should be gravel?
  • Should the route from Kelvin Heights to Frankton be an upgrade of the existing waterfront trail so that it is sealed, widened and lit, or a new route along Peninsula Road?

Take the survey now and give us your views!


Next steps

The information you provide will be used alongside our technical research to test the preferred network.

We need to determine the level of design for each route (i.e. gravel or asphalt, route width and facilities) and identify how much land will be needed. Once we have confirmed the preferred network we can finalise the Business Case, ready to be submitted for funding.

If funding is approved, we will undertake detailed design (looking at each route in closer detail) and get any necessary approvals under the Resource Management Act. There will be further opportunities for public engagement during this time.